Global Effects of Smoking, of Quitting, and of Taxing Tobacco

January 7/2014

Dalla Lana School of Public Health Professor Dr. Prabhat Jha’s study Global Effects of Smoking, of Quitting, and of Taxing Tobacco published in the New England Journal of Medicine, found that tripling tobacco taxes around the world could reduce the number of smokers by 433.3 million people and prevent 200 million premature deaths from lung cancer and other smoking-related diseases. 

Read the Star article here.”

Excerpt:

Global Effects of Smoking, of Quitting, and of Taxing Tobacco
Prabhat Jha, M.D., D.Phil., and Richard Peto, F.R.S.
N Engl J Med 2014; 370:60-68January 2, 2014DOI: 10.1056/NEJMra1308383

On the basis of current smoking patterns, with a global average of about 50% of young men and 10% of young women becoming smokers and relatively few stopping, annual tobacco-attributable deaths will rise from about 5 million in 2010 to more than 10 million a few decades hence,1-3 as the young smokers of today reach middle and old age. This increase is due partly to population growth and partly to the fact that, in some large populations, generations in which few people smoked substantial numbers of cigarettes throughout adult life are being succeeded by generations in which many people did so. There were about 100 million deaths from tobacco in the 20th century, most in developed countries.2,3 If current smoking patterns persist, tobacco will kill about 1 billion people this century, mostly in low- and middle-income countries. About half of these deaths will occur before 70 years of age.    ………………continue reading