Contact
Dan Allman
Location
108N, Munk School of Global Affairs (1 Devonshire Place)
Series/Type
Dates
  • April 12, 2017 from 10:00am to 12:00pm

In this presentation, I explore the use of health administrative data for the purposes of screening recent migrants to Canada, towards the early identification of those living with viral hepatitis B and/or C infections. Viral Hepatitis B and C are among the most burdensome infectious diseases in Ontario with disproportionately higher rates among foreign-born individuals, many with undiagnosed latent infections that can lead to future adverse health outcomes. The point of migration presents a convenient bottleneck for screening programs and interventions geared at reducing disease progression while increasing quality of life and health outcomes through early treatment. However, such programs also have the potential to create undesired social stigma both externally and internally to foreign-born communities. I present preliminary findings from my doctoral thesis, and reflect on previous work on screening and surveillance among foreign-born and marginalised groups within Canada.

Abdool Yasseen is a PhD candidate in epidemiology at the Dalla Lana School of Public Health, a trainee in the collaborative program in public health policy, and a senior Lupina fellow at the Munk School of Global Affairs. Abdool’s research interests are in syndromic surveillance for infectious diseases, and he investigates health equity issues among marginalized and foreign-born populations. His doctoral research focuses on evaluating current viral hepatitis screening practices among recent migrants to Canada.

Dan Allman is a Sociologist and an Assistant Professor at the Dalla Lana School of Public Health, University of Toronto, where he is Acting Director of the HIV Social, Behavioural and Epidemiological Studies Unit. Professor Allman explores the social and structural production of risk and well-being among those considered marginal, vulnerable or peripheral to a society’s core. His research interests include the sociology of medicine, equity, global health and new techniques for public health research.

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