Multidisciplinary Aspects of Addictions


Course Number
PAS3700H
Series
PAS (Collaborative Program in Addiction Studies)
Format
Seminar
Course Instructor(s)
Bruna Brands, Dale Kuehl, Hayley Hamilton

Course Description

  • This course is the core course offered by the Collaborative Program in Addiction Studies (CoPAS). The Collaborative Program has been established to integrate graduate education in the field of addictions across departments in the School of Graduate Studies.
  • Graduate departments participating in CoPAS are: Adult Education, Community Development & Counselling Psychology; Anthropology; Biomedical Engineering; Criminology; Information Studies; Institute for Medical Science; Pharmacology; Pharmaceutical Sciences; Psychology; Public Health Sciences; Social Work; and Sociology.
  • This course is required for students enrolled in the Collaborative Program. Its aim is to provide students with core knowledge and understanding of different behavioural, biological, historical, medical and socio cultural aspects of addictions. It will also provide information about the aetiology of addictions and contemporary approaches to prevention and treatment.
  • Coordinator:  Marilyn Herie,
  • Instructors: Bruna Brands (Pharmacology), Norman Giesbrecht (Public Health Sciences)

Course Objectives

By the end of the term, students will:

  • 1. Have a broad base of knowledge concerning the addictions, including the use and abuse of alcohol, tobacco and other psychoactive drugs, and gambling.
  • 2. Have been exposed to addictions from the perspectives of several disciplines.
  • 3. Understand the basic biological mechanisms and effects of addictions, including psychoactive drug use and abuse, and gambling.
  • 4. Understand vulnerability to addictions, including biological, psychological, and social factors, including availability.
  • 5. Be aware of addictions from a public health perspective and understand the major social policy options for the prevention of addictions.
  • 6. Be aware of efficacious approaches to the treatment of addictions.

General Requirements

  • None