Faculty Member

David Coburn B.A., M.A., Ph.D. (Sociology)

Email Address(es)
david.coburn@utoronto.ca
Office Phone
None Home: 250 595-3536
Office Address
Dalla Lana School of Public Health Health Sciences Building
155 College Street Toronto, ON M5T 3M7
Division(s)/Office
Social & Behavioural Health Sciences Division
Position
Professor Emeritus
SGS Status
Member Emeritus
Appointment Status
Emeritus

Research Interests

  • Globalization, neo-liberalism, health and health inequalities
  • Health occupations and professions
  • Political economy of health

Other Affiliations

Adjunct Faculty, Department of Sociology, University of Victoria, Victoria, B.C.

Primary Teaching Responsibilities

None – Retired Professor Emeritus

Current Research Projects

With, E. S. Coburn, research on the changing economic ideology of the IMF and the World Bank.

Representative Publications

Papers on Neo-liberalism and Global Health Trends and Inequalities

Coburn, D. “Inequality and Health“. In The Socialist Register, , 2010, C. Leys and L.Panitch (Eds.) 2010. Appears in book form as C. Leys and L. Panitch (eds.) Morbid Symptoms: Health under Capitalism. Fernwood Publishers, 2010.

Coburn, D. “Global Health: a political economy of historical trends and contemporary inequalities“. In, G. Teeple and S. McBride (eds.), Relations of Global Power.: Neoliberal Order and Disorder. University of Toronto Press, 2010.

Coburn, D. “Beyond the income inequality hypothesis: globalization, neo-liberalism and health inequalities.” Social Science and Medicine v.58, (1): 2004: 41-56.

Coburn, D. "Income inequality, social cohesion and the health status of populations: the role of neo-liberalism". Social Science and Medicine, 51 (1), 2000: 35-46. See Social Science and Medicine: Symposium on David Coburn: the role of neo-liberalism V.51.

Major Papers on the Health Occupations and Professions

Coburn, D. “Medical dominance then and now: critical reflections. Health Sociology Review, 15(5), 2006:432- 443.

Coburn, D. and Willis, E. “The medical professsion: knowledge, power and autonomy”. In Handbook of Social Studies in Health and Medicine. Eds. G.L Albrecht, R. Fitzpatrick and S. Scrimshaw (Eds.) International Handbook of |Social Studies in Health. SAGE Publications, London, Californie, 2000

Coburn, D. 'Phases of capitalism, welfare states, medical dominance and health care in Ontario.' International Journal of Health Services, 29 (4): 1999: 833-851.

Coburn, D. ‘The development of Canadian nursing: professionalization and proletarianization.’ International Journal of Health Services, 18, 3, 1988: 437-456

Coburn, D. and Biggs, C.L. ‘Limits to medical dominance: the case of chiropractic.’ Social Science and Medicine 22, 10, 1986: 1035-1046.

Papers on Population Health

Coburn, D., Denny, K., Mykhalovskiy, E., McDonough, P, Robertson, A. and Love, R. ‘Population health in Canada: a brief critique. American Journal of Public Health, March, 2003, V.93 (3):392-397

Poland, B., Coburn, D. Eakin, J. and Robertson, A ‘Health, equity and health care: a critique of a ‘Population Health’ perspective on the Derterminants of health.’ Social Science and Medicine, V.46, No.7, 1998: 785-798